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Buslot Buntong (Drain Bamboo Poles) Challenge: An Anti-Dengue Campaign

In many neighborhoods, bamboo fences are common fare.  The use of bamboo as material for fence is most affordable for Filipinos especially in rural and sub-urban areas.

 There is a proper way to cut the poles – near the nodes. A wrong way of cutting, however, exposes us to risk. If cut too far away from the nodes, the open bamboo cylinders are receptacles of water and — possible mosquito breeding sites. Dengue fever is one common condition not only in poor communities in the tropics. Even developed city-states like Singapore have to deal with it.

Let us not host mosquitoes in our homes. Often, we are reminded that receptacles or catchments should be turned upside down, be emptied to help drive away mosquitoes.

Receptacles on bamboo poles in fences, however, could never be turned upside down like pails or canisters. Instead, we must put a hole at the bottom of the receptacle to drain water. This will rid us from breeding sites for mosquitoes and possibly mosquito-borne diseases like dengue.

With a hole as drain, you may also cover the bamboo receptacle with anything clean to block entry of liquid.

We know this is an old practice for many. I got reminded of this by a family member. It’s time to share this practice to others so they can also do it in their neighborhoods.

Things needed: A hammer or any hard object like a rock to be used to pound. A steel bar or any pointed concrete object.

Time needed: Five minutes only.

Apil na sa Buslot Buntong Anti Dengue Challenge!

What can be done? Include anti-dengue measures as an item in the agenda of meeting in the purok/zone or barangay. Invite a health advocate to speak on dengue and what can be done against it. During community work or pahina, include the checking and draining of bamboo poles used in fencing the neighborhood as part of the many anti-dengue measures.  If you are already doing it, you may post the photo/video of you taking the challenge in your neighborhood (Optional).

One simple safety act a day, keeps the danger away.

Waltzib of Kalasungay, Malaybalay City, Bukidnon, Philippines
Email: waltzib@gmail.com

 

Bamboo poles receptacles are mosquito breeding sites, too.Bamboo poles receptacles are mosquito breeding sites, too.

Bamboo fences are in every communityBamboo fences are in every community

One pound to do itOne pound to do it

Simple tools for a noble actSimple tools for a noble act

Beginner’s Random thoughts on running in Malaybalay City

  1. Come to the race to compete only with yourself.
  2. Expect to be laughed at; laugh with them, it’s another exercise.
  3. Stretch your body before running and your limits, too; but do not be suicidal
  4. Prepare for the race and your needs after it, including one more item at the drug store: muscle pain ointment.
  5. Listen to encouragements from friends, ignore negative remarks from ‘friends’
  6. Use water and food to keep you going, not to slow you down
  7. If you can’t run faster, go slow, or walk; but don’t stop.
  8. Dress light and feel light.
  9. Smile, don’t talk, to an acquaintance while running to save breath
  10. Thank God, family, friends before and after running, it counts to be grateful of the gift of the human life.
  11. Run even if there is no race or competition; if you feel good about stepping on the finish line; be aware that the best is yet to come.
  12. Help keep our community peaceful and free so we still have fields, trails, and streets where we can still run.

I made it!

I got these points printed in my mind from the starting line of the 4.2 km. Panahik night run on January 22 up to dinner tonight.

Finally, I was able to write it down.

I’m sure there will be more I can remember later on.

To those who have other thoughts to add, please key it in as a comment. (or make your own list.)

We don’t know, maybe in the future we can write a book about the gift of running in the free streets of our communities!

Cheers!

The Outsider

Traveling to communities have brought me to many experiences —mostly encounters of acquiantances.

You just don’t get to meet a person or group of people, you get to meet and have a chance to be in touch with their culture, their history, and their varying experiences.

The different-ness and uniqueness at the point of my contact with them result to dialogues (and sometimes when less fortunate about it, insightful frictions). It makes for wonderful insights, some of which figure in some of my writings/ reports. Read More…

Corruption inside bus No. 2075

Inside the crowded air-conditioned bus from Davao, the faces of the passengers looked weary and their eyes looked tired. At least 15 new passengers embarked from the busy, old Valencia City terminal. 

For a moment the vehicle looked like a wet public market, and then sounded like one.

The passengers settled in the vacant seats at the rear end of the bus, and then almost simultaneously released sighs of relief. 

It was probably the last air-con bus to leave for Cagayan de Oro before dinner.

It was not quite relieving, however, for others who have to stand as all seats were taken. Some others were left waiting eternally at the messy terminal.

Shortly after, the bus rolled off.

Still tired, most of the passengers were silent for a moment, and another. 

At the front portion of the bus, the conductor, a stocky middle-aged man with a rounded face, called on the passengers bound for Cagayan de Oro for tickets.

“Kinsa pa’y wala’y ticket diri?” he asked a column of “standing” passengers. Read More…

The never ending story of war —right in our backyard

Waking up to a broadcaster howling against the Moro Islamic Liberation Front one morning, I was tempted to turn the radio off.

 

The grain of his voice has pestered me in my space in that corner of the house.

 

“Maayo ng girahon sila kay gusto man diay nila og Independence!” Gusto pa gyod nila iapil ang tibuok Bukidnon aron mohimo sila og regional government!” (It’s good to go to war with them since they wanted independence. They also like to cover the whole Bukidnon in a bid to form a regional government!).

 

I was really forced to get on my feet even if I only had three hours of sleep yet and dialed the radio station. Read More…

IBP laments slow pace of cases in Bukidnon courts

Justice delayed is justice denied and in Bukidnon, whose courts are swamped with cases, resetting a trial today would likely mean waiting for 2010, an official of the Integrated Bar of the Philippines has warned.
Anastacio Rosos, IBP Bukidnon chapter president, said the problem has hampered the speedy dispensation of justice in the province’s four regional trial courts.

He said the lack of judges caused each of the four courts to have a load of at least 1,000 cases, affecting specially the hearing of criminal cases. Read full report here.

He said one indicator is that the courts’ schedules had been filled up, that cases

to be reset for hearing could be scheduled in 2010.

Rosos said IBP found the whole year of 2009 is filled with court hearings. He said they have started plotting out schedules for 2010.

Released Philippine eagle killed in Mt. Kitanglad

Three-year-old Philippine Eagle “Kagsabua” was killed by a local airgun shooter near the village where
he was released just four months ago inside the Mt. Kitanglad Range Natural Park, an environment official said.

Felix Mirasol, community environment and natural resource officer, confirmed to MindaNews Wednesday that witnesses have identified the culprit described as a young man who failed to attend information
drive on the Philippine Eagle (pithecophaga jefferyi).

Mirasol is the Mt. Kitanglad Protected Area superintendent.

Kagsabua was last sighted on July 7 and was known to be missing between July 8 and 10, Mirasol said. He said a search operation was immediately launched. Read More…